Saturday, July 14, 2018

On the virtue of persistence

Producing RPG material as a labour of love requires persistence. When it starts to involve a team it requires even more so.  When you get real particular about wanting the talents of extremely specific individuals who have their own schedules and their own projects, you better get used to waiting.

It was in the far off year of 2012, six years ago, that I ran two campaigns (one at home, one online) through the City of Tears.  It was my goal to really hone down on what made a good dungeon based campaign from years of theory and past campaigns.  The City of Tears is designed so that your group can spend months of real life weekly game sessions delving into a dungeon and puttering about the immediate area on "side quests" which all lead back to the dungeon.

And it has been a fair amount of time to get this work polished.  I wanted the layout of a specific graphic designer (Jensen Toperzer) because she does absolutely gorgeous work. I wanted the art work of Jez Gordon because his stark art is exactly what was in my minds eye. I wanted the maps of Dyson Logos, because if I am going to do a proper dungeon I want dungeon maps from the best. All of these people it turns out had different priorities of their own and weren't just sitting around waiting me to call.  It took 5 years before I got through all three queues.  I've had a completed City of Tears since last fall.  But after five years of working on something, I want it to get a little more fanfare.

So I saved it up to be part of a three part release of the major projects I have been working on:

An Omnibus of all my self-published adventures
A full art version of Neoclassical Geek Revival

And the City of Tears


A lot of the attention on the kickstarter has been about the first two points.  But I want to make sure that the news of City of Tears isn't lost in the shuffle because it is an absolutely gorgeous work. It is worth the wait.

Get it HERE

Thursday, July 12, 2018

The Ennies and writing on autopilot

As you may be aware,  the writing contest between Kiel Chenier and myself that spawned "The Scenario from Ontario" is up for an Ennie award.  You should vote for it to win. If you rank it a 1 and don't rank anything else in that category we'd be much more likely to win.

Kiel recently did an interview about the adventure and talked about how the short time frame made it so that he wrote it almost on autopilot and so a lot of his natural inclinations for how adventures work bled into it.  He discusses how themes such as the banal yet powerful evil of greed mixed with industrialization can easily overshadow the supernatural in terms of true misery caused. The theme that deposing a powerful person creates a vacuum and that the players will have to weigh filling that gap and becoming the villain themselves or seeing if the new person who fills the void is even worse than the last.  Those are his "autopilot" themes.

A friend referred to my own entry (Maple Witch of the Beaver Wars) as very visibly "Zzarchovian",  when pressed on what that means he brought forth a few points that would seem to be my own autopilot for adventure writing:

Quote

1. Some sort of ongoing problem emerging from the dungeon that provides hooks (like kids missing in Pale Lady)
2. Interact-able factions surrounding/inhabiting the sandbox (the haud/nish/french/witch division in MW, the priest/pagans/others in ATDB)
3. abstracted/random navigation surrounding the dungeon, often with clues pointing to dungeon 
4. a dungeon with one or more artefacts/magic effects intended to have complex consequences for PCs (the bassinet, the cube) 

So, seeing as I have an Omnibus of all my NGR/OSR adventures temporarily available over at the Kickstarter I am running, I figure I have enough of a body of work for people for people to make their own thoughts on what a "Zzarchovian Adventure" is and I would love to hear them.


Money Money Money.....MONEY

Sunday, July 8, 2018

So we are One Thousand Percent sure that this is a good idea

In the first 48 hours of the kickstarter going live we have hit 1000% funding.


We have hit 4 stretch goals and are rounding on a fifth.  Backers who go for a full art version of Neoclassical Geek Revival will have three different art options to choose from.   Scrap Princess, Dyson Logos, Alex Mayo, and hopefully soon we will unlock a fourth option with Chris Huth.

Remember that this campaign is of a shorter than normal length, so time is counting down.

 A sample of the art and layout by Dyson Logos

Friday, July 6, 2018

The Neoclassical Geek Revival Kickstarter is live

As mentioned previously we are launching a kickstarter so you can gain access to some books for NGR.  If you are reading this blog you probably already know as much about it as I could babble on here so I'll give the cliff notes.

1.) It only runs until the end of July
2.) Not every book available in the kickstarter will be available after the fact (even as PDF)
3.) Those that remain available will be more expensive.

If this is something you are interested in, you can back the project here